USA

Ohio-town bans new car washes

Cleveland suburb puts cap on new car washes.

A Cleveland suburb has decided to limit the number of car washes in its town. The new legislation of Brook Park didn’t use the word ‘ban.’ Instead, it capped the number of car washes at one for every 10,000 people. 

According to local news channel KTVZ.com, this means that Brook Park (a town of 18,000 residents) should only have two car washes.

Right now, Brook Park has more than a half-dozen car washes. Among them are old-school hand car washes, brand new express washes, a laser wash and gas stations with a rollover. There’s even a drive-thru car wash and beverage store.

More diversity

The Cleveland suburb says it had enough of the wave of car wash proposals. Brook Park Mayor Edward Orcutt says his city needs more diverse retail options. Late last year they already put a moratorium on new car-wash projects. Now they are making that pause permanent.

It’s not the only Northeast Ohio community taking that approach. According to KTVZ, cities are reacting to a wave of car-wash proposals. A boom that started in western and southern states but recently reached the Midwest. Changes in technology, profitability and customer habits are driving huge growth in the once-grubby business.

“The last 10 years, the car wash industry has been on a tear,” said Eric Wulf, CEO of the International Carwash Association.

Dollar stores

That’s putting public officials on edge. Parma, Parma Heights and Stow have passed similar law changes to what Brook Park just approved. And other cities are watching.

The city’s new zoning-code change won’t impact existing businesses. But it will block new ones from opening.

Parma Heights did something similar in February, setting a limit of one car wash for every 12,000 residents. Stow expanded on its moratorium last year.

The regulatory fight isn’t over, according to KTVZ. Northeast Ohio cities are looking to put limits on other types of businesses, from dollar stores and self-storage facilities to short-term rentals and dispensaries.

Also read: 

Author: Rene Passet

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Ohio-town bans new car washes | CarwashPro
USA

Ohio-town bans new car washes

Cleveland suburb puts cap on new car washes.

A Cleveland suburb has decided to limit the number of car washes in its town. The new legislation of Brook Park didn’t use the word ‘ban.’ Instead, it capped the number of car washes at one for every 10,000 people. 

According to local news channel KTVZ.com, this means that Brook Park (a town of 18,000 residents) should only have two car washes.

Right now, Brook Park has more than a half-dozen car washes. Among them are old-school hand car washes, brand new express washes, a laser wash and gas stations with a rollover. There’s even a drive-thru car wash and beverage store.

More diversity

The Cleveland suburb says it had enough of the wave of car wash proposals. Brook Park Mayor Edward Orcutt says his city needs more diverse retail options. Late last year they already put a moratorium on new car-wash projects. Now they are making that pause permanent.

It’s not the only Northeast Ohio community taking that approach. According to KTVZ, cities are reacting to a wave of car-wash proposals. A boom that started in western and southern states but recently reached the Midwest. Changes in technology, profitability and customer habits are driving huge growth in the once-grubby business.

“The last 10 years, the car wash industry has been on a tear,” said Eric Wulf, CEO of the International Carwash Association.

Dollar stores

That’s putting public officials on edge. Parma, Parma Heights and Stow have passed similar law changes to what Brook Park just approved. And other cities are watching.

The city’s new zoning-code change won’t impact existing businesses. But it will block new ones from opening.

Parma Heights did something similar in February, setting a limit of one car wash for every 12,000 residents. Stow expanded on its moratorium last year.

The regulatory fight isn’t over, according to KTVZ. Northeast Ohio cities are looking to put limits on other types of businesses, from dollar stores and self-storage facilities to short-term rentals and dispensaries.

Also read: 

Author: Rene Passet

Add your comment

characters remaining.

Log in through one of the following social media partners to comment.